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  • $1,560,000.00 Motor Vehicle Accident
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  • $1,250,000.00 Motorcycle Accident
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While the coronavirus pandemic will likely mean that everyone’s holiday season is at least a little bit different this year as compared to years past, there are some things that remain the same. Gifts will be exchanged. Special meals will be planned. Accidents, injuries, and illnesses will happen, possibly triggering a Cape Cod product liability lawsuit.

While not every product mishap will result in an injury or illness significant enough to trigger litigation, some, unfortunately, will. Fortunately, the law provides some protection against unreasonably safe products, provided that the consumer does his or her part to assert a claim in a timely fashion.

As in other types of personal injury litigation, the burden of proof in product injury cases is on the injured individual, so it is important that any evidence concerning the bad product be saved and preserved as possible evidence. Contacting an experienced product liability attorney is also a critical step in the process of receiving fair compensation for medical expenses, lost earnings, pain and suffering, and other damages caused by a defective product.

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In a Massachusetts criminal case, such as a matter in which someone is accused of operating a vehicle under the influence, there are several potential defenses that may be asserted by the defendant. One of these is a violation of the defendant’s constitutional rights during the collection of the evidence that the Commonwealth seeks to use to prove its case at trial.

One such example would be evidence that was illegally seized in violation of the Fourth Amendment to the United States Constitution. This amendment forbids unreasonable searches and seizures and requires that probable cause be shown before a search warrant is issued.

The burden of proof in a criminal prosecution is on the Commonwealth, so excluding illegally obtained evidence at trial can be an important step to a defendant in his or her quest for justice. Without certain key evidence, it may be possible to have charges reduced or, in some instances, get a Cape Cod drunk driving case dismissed.

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There are many steps that must be completed in order to recover fair monetary compensation for injuries or wrongful death at the hands of a health care professional in Massachusetts. One of the first hurdles that must be crossed is making it past the decision of the medical malpractice tribunal that reviews such cases as part of the legal process.

In order for a Cape Cod medical malpractice case to proceed past the tribunal and onward toward trial, there must be enough evidence of negligence by the defendants for the tribunal to find that there is a legitimate question of liability. Not every case “makes the cut,” so to speak. Sometimes, even though the patient was hurt or may even have died, there just isn’t enough evidence of wrongdoing by the doctor or other medical professional for the case to make it past the tribunal.

Of course, opinions can vary as to whether the threshold has been met. Sometimes, a plaintiff appeals a decision that would have terminated his or her case and finds legal recourse in the appellate process.

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Most Cape Cod personal injury cases are pursued on a theory of negligence. To prove that a defendant was negligent, the plaintiff must show that the defendant owed the plaintiff a legal duty, that the defendant’s conduct breached this duty, and that, as a proximate result, the plaintiff suffered legally compensable damages.

Sometimes, however, a defendant may be accused of conduct that surpassed that of simple negligence in terms of its culpability. This is called gross negligence or recklessness by the courts.

An example of simple negligence might be a defendant slightly exceeding the speed limit and causing a collision. Gross negligence, by contrast, might occur if a defendant was driving while intoxicated and exceeding the speed limit not just by a few miles per hour but perhaps 30 or 40 miles per hour.

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There are several issues that routinely arise in Cape Cod workers’ compensation cases. One of these is the payment or reimbursement of the injured employee’s medical expenses.

Ideally, the employee’s medical expenses would be paid in the regular course of business following his or her accident or illness, so long as certain conditions were met (such as seeing a doctor who was approved by the employer’s workers’ compensation insurance carrier). Sometimes, however, this does not happen, and the employee must seek assistance from the court.

Even if the workers’ compensation insurance company initially refused to pay the injured worker’s medical expenses, the court may order the company to pay such expenses, either directly to the medical providers or as reimbursement to the worker (or, sometimes, to a health insurance company that paid the expenses on the worker’s behalf). Of course, there are sometimes situations in which the court finds that the workers’ compensation insurance company was not obligated to make such payments.

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As important as it is in a Cape Cod personal injury lawsuit to be able to prove that the defendant’s negligence was the proximate cause of the plaintiff’s injuries, this is only one of several steps in pursuing fair compensation. Additionally, it is important that the plaintiff understand, to the fullest extent possible under the law, the insurance coverage that may be available to the various parties to the lawsuit.

Sometimes, insurance coverage issues become part of the plaintiff’s suit. They may, however, be the source of a separately filed case.

Such was the case in a recent matter arising from an accident at a trade show. Fortunately for the injured individual, the court found that liability coverage was available for the injured man’s accident.

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Cape Cod car accident cases require the plaintiff to prove, by a preponderance of the evidence, that the defendant breached the applicable duty of care and that this breach of care was the proximate cause of the damages for which the plaintiff seeks compensation. Generally speaking, a defendant who crashes her car into an innocent motorist will probably be found to have violated the duty to keep a proper lookout.

However, there are exceptions to this rule. The defendant’s liability hinges on whether he or she failed to act in a reasonably prudent manner, hence causing the accident. There are several factors that can come into play in determining whether the defendant’s actions were reasonable.

Although the issue does not come up very often, it is possible that the defendant may be able to avoid liability by proving that he or she was incapable of acting in a reasonably prudent manner. An example would be a motorist who experiences a sudden medical emergency that causes him or her to lose control of his or her vehicle. While such an event will not always relieve the defendant of responsibility for an accident, there is a good chance that it could. After all, the purpose of negligence law is to encourage individuals to act reasonably. When a medical emergency arises, this may not be possible.

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In a typical Cape Cod personal injury lawsuit, the plaintiff seeks to recover monetary compensation for damages by asserting a claim of negligence. There are four basic elements to the tort of negligence (duty, breach of duty, damages, and proximate causation).

The plaintiff has the duty to prove each element by a preponderance of the evidence. This requires him or her to convince the jury that the evidence weighs more in his or her favor than in the opponent’s (visualize a tipping of the scales of justice, if you will).

There are other possible remedies that can arise from an alleged act of negligence, including what was described by an appellate court as “a seldom used equitable remedy” in a case filed by a nursing home resident in 2018. The appellate court has now weighed in on the dismissal of the woman’s “complaint for discovery.”

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When a patient is dissatisfied with treatment received from a doctor, hospital, or other medical provider, he or she may have a claim for medical malpractice. An experienced Cape Cod medical malpractice attorney can explain the process of asserting such a claim.

In some instances, there may be the possibility of some other type of legal course, as well. However, such situations are the exception rather the rule.

In a medical malpractice lawsuit, the burden of proof rests on the plaintiff. In order to prevail on a claim for malpractice against an allegedly negligent health care provider, the plaintiff must be able to present proof that the defendant breached the applicable standard of care and that this was the proximate cause of the damages for which the plaintiff seeks monetary compensation.

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In order for a Cape Cod medical malpractice case to be filed in a particular court, there must be subject matter jurisdiction. Most such cases are filed in state court, but sometimes there may be jurisdiction in federal court.

One such situation arises when the person who injured the plaintiff was an employee of the federal government. Generally speaking, the government is immune from lawsuits, but there are special exceptions in these types of cases.

Of course, the government has teams of attorneys whose job is to make sure that only qualifying cases are allowed to proceed. Just like other defendants, the government has a right to defend itself in court, even at the pre-trial stage with regard to jurisdictional issues.

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